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WHAT IS KEMETIC YOGA?

EgyptianSky Kemetic Studio
Breathe, Flow, and Internal Power 

A. Three Breathing Exercises

B. Nine Poses

C. Six Transitions

 

  • The Pose of Immortality

  • The Pose of Auset / Maat

  • The Pose of Min / Sekhmet

  • The Teken Pose / Teken Sequence

  • The Sesh Poses

  • The Pose of Anpu  (Peaceful Warrior Pose)

  • The Maat--Ka Sequence

  • The Pose of Selkhet

  • The Pose of Ausar

  • The Pose of Geb

 

I researched and studied information on Kemet (Egypt) in honor of my ancestors for Black History Month as a part of my studies of Kemetic history and yoga practices.  After returning from Kemet, in December, 2017, I had  to absorb and digest a good deal of knowledge after having had this edifying experience.


Along with seeing Egypt and its hieroglyphs and reading about its history, I began to understand its significance—from ancient times--for human health and general well-being. Touching the temple walls and feeling the energy surrounding me, and walking through the monuments and pyramids while reconnecting spiritually with our ancestors, I was amazed to how they took the time to preserve and leave behind such a history.

Intriguing is the rebirth and renewal of the body, mind, soul and spirit through Yoga practices; especially noting that these Kemetic practices have been unknown to us to date. 

Fortunately, from my studies with master Yirser Ra Hotep and Kemetic scholar Jabari Osaze, a true honor, I learned that yoga itself was not born in India but rather in Africa; particularly in Kemet; i.e., northeast Africa.

The facts are that while Indian yoga asana dates back at least 5,000 years and was practiced by ancient ascetics since that time, scholars now know through documentation that the practice is actually at least 10,000 years old and is depicted on temple walls in Egypt from pre-dynastic times.

The ancient Egyptians (“Kemetic” people) left this legacy of artwork and spiritual texts depicting figures in yoga poses. They are also discovered in Kemetic tombs. And the artifacts also reveal symbols representing concepts in the philosophy of Kemetic yoga as a practice of well-being. Thus these ancient versions of Egyptian yoga combined poses with deep breathing and meditation as the Indian masters were to emulate in more recent times. The modern forms of Kemetic yoga emerged in the 1970’s and are based upon research done by Dr. Asar Hapi and master Yirser Ra Hotep.


The Kemetic Style

 

The Kemetic style of yoga’s primary focus is on breath control and meditation. The physical movement and poses serve these goals. During a session the movements flow continuously from one pose to the next. In addition, each pose may involve multiple movements. For example, in the Tree pose, Kemetic yoga practitioners will form ‘the trunk of the tree’ first and then advance the movements to form the branches and roots of the tree. As in other styles of yoga, breathing and movement are coordinated to boost the energy circulating through your body.

 

The movements in Kemetic yoga are fluid and combine the control of breath, rhythm, and concentration. They relate to the elements: Earth (Geb), Water (Hapi), Air (Shu), and Fire (Ra or Re). The key principle in Kemetic yoga that it make it unique, distinguishing it from those known to Indian yoga, are that breath control is connected to body alignment through performing these postures in a geometric progression.

MAAT KA SEQUENCE

The Structure of a Kemetic Yoga Session

 

A typical Kemetic yoga session begins with cleansing breaths followed by a “Mummy pose” that will enable one to enter into a state of complete relaxation according to master Yirser Ra Hotep (as described on his website “Kemetic Yoga”). As the session continues, you will perform a range of poses, including forward and backward bends as well as spinal twists. The side-to-side trunk rotations help to align your spine and stimulate your internal organs. They also relieve tension from your major muscles groups. Master Hotep says that the methods of Kemetic yoga will “recondition your mind.”

Benefits

Practitioners of Kemetic yoga view the style as one that heals and regenerates the body. The movements deepen the breath, energize the life force, and wards off diseases. While standard yoga poses, such as the Bridge, the Cobra and the Lotus positions are used in this style, the poses in Kemetic yoga are seen as secondary to controlling breathing cycles. The sequence of geometric poses is designed to align your skeletal system and correcting imbalances. Thus, Kemetic yoga helps you to boost circulation and relieve stress.

 

What You Will Learn

You will find the answers to these questions:


A) Why does yoga start with proper breathing?

B) How does the breath function in the body?

C) How is the breath related to the spirit?

D) How does correct breathing heal?

 

You will also learn how to:
 

A)  Breathe correctly and comfortably

B)  Create flow in your practice

C)  Apply deep breathing through movement

D)  Encourage meditation and focus

E)  Release tension, pain and stress with the breath control.

F)  Correct alignment of the body with gentle poses.

G)  Increase and balance one’s energy levels


Credentials of the Instructor      
YOGA-SKILLS SCHOOL OF KEMETIC YOGA

 

A Certificate of completion of a 200 Hour Kemetic Yoga Teacher Training Course 
A RYS 200 Registered Yoga School a Yoga Alliance ID 6273

An Exemplary Pose

For instance, the Kemetic yoga’s “Pose of Immortality” (above) mirrors the representation found on Pharoah Tutankhamen’s chair, according to Rosalind Cummings-Yeates’ article on “Egyptian Yoga” in the "Yoga Journal." The pose requires a truck twist while kneeling on one leg with the arms extended horizontally to one’s sides. It aligns one’s spinal column, stimulates energy flow to one’s organs, and strengthens one’s knee and ankle joints. To execute this pose it is required that one sit on one’s legs, bent at the knees, with the insteps of one’s feet placed under the buttocks; resting them on the ground. The arms are also placed in front of the chest, and the hands are held in a prayer-like position facing forward.

Then the right knee is raised and one places the right foot on the ground. Following that, the truck is twisted to the left side while the arms are maintained in a prayer-like position (with the right elbow placed on the inside aspect of the right knee while the twisted torso continues to face toward the left side of the body). On the exhalation breath one’s palms are placed together at the chest with the fingers pointing in opposite directions.

 

Following that, one extends both arms outward and makes fists with both hands. On the next inhalation breath, one rotates the head to the center position, then to the full-left (looking backward, as it were), then to the center again and then, finally, the whole torso and head are returned to the front from whence the pose originated. This sequence is then repeated on the other side of the body.

For instance, the Kemetic yoga’s “Pose of Immortality” (above) mirrors the representation found on Pharoah Tutankhamen’s chair, according to Rosalind Cummings-Yeates’ article on “Egyptian Yoga” in the "Yoga Journal." The pose requires a truck twist while kneeling on one leg with the arms extended horizontally to one’s sides. It aligns one’s spinal column, stimulates energy flow to one’s organs, and strengthens one’s knee and ankle joints. To execute this pose it is required that one sit on one’s legs, bent at the knees, with the insteps of one’s feet placed under the buttocks; resting them on the ground. The arms are also placed in front of the chest, and the hands are held in a prayer-like position facing forward.

Then the right knee is raised and one places the right foot on the ground. Following that, the truck is twisted to the left side while the arms are maintained in a prayer-like position (with the right elbow placed on the inside aspect of the right knee while the twisted torso continues to face toward the left side of the body). On the exhalation breath one’s palms are placed together at the chest with the fingers pointing in opposite directions.

 

Following that, one extends both arms outward and makes fists with both hands. On the next inhalation breath, one rotates the head to the center position, then to the full-left (looking backward, as it were), then to the center again and then, finally, the whole torso and head are returned to the front from whence the pose originated. This sequence is then repeated on the other side of the body.